Monthly Archives: January, 2019

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Addressing workplace bullying, harassment must be a business priority: Panel

January 31st, 2019 Uncategorised

Source: | WWW.COS-MAG.COM

 

Organizations that don’t seriously address bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination in their workplaces will struggle to attract and retain good employees and suffer from poor productivity, according to a recent panel discussion at the National Club in Toronto.

“Organizations need to tackle this uncomfortable topic, or risk falling behind,” said Sheldon Kennedy, abuse survivor and co-founder of the Respect Group. “They need to ask the tough questions to determine if this type of behaviour is happening in their organization. They need to be prepared for what they might find and be committed to taking action to address and end it.”

The panel, which included Louise Bradley, president and CEO, Mental Health Commission of Canada, Pamela Jeffery, president, The Pamela Jeffery Group and Soula Courlas, partner, KPMG, noted that ignoring the issue not only affects employee retention but it hurts productivity and profitability. Experiencing bullying and harassment in the workplace can trigger mental health problems and illnesses, which, according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, are the leading cause of short‐ and long‐term disability. The economic burden has been estimated at $51‐billion per year, almost $20‐billion of which comes from workplace losses.

While pointing out the risks of not addressing the issue, the panellists noted that many organizations are taking real action to address the issue.

“This isn’t just about focusing on the bad individuals,” said Kennedy. “Ninety-eight per cent of individuals want to be good, so focus on them and give them the tools to be better.”

For those companies who don’t know where to start, the panellists said the most important step was instituting a culture of respect and zero tolerance for toxic behaviour in their organizations — a tone that needs to come straight from the CEO.

“This will require a willingness from leadership to face the hard truths about what is happening inside their walls,” said Courlas. “Bullying can be subtle. Education is key to helping people recognize it. Leadership has a duty to proactively work towards eradicating this type of behaviour, which will inevitably help unlock the best of their people.”

Sheldon Kennedy has spent most of his adult life fighting the good fight

January 31st, 2019 Sheldon Kennedy

SOURCE: THE STAR

Sheldon Kennedy was tired. How could he not be tired? Everyone gets worn out at some point by the grind of work, responsibilities, life. We can all buckle under the things we carry. Sheldon Kennedy just had a better reason than most.

“I really learned that I can’t, I just can’t carry all the weight,” says Kennedy. “And I didn’t realize that. Basically, I have to be healthy myself. If I’m healthy myself, then I’m going to show up the best I can for others.

“At the end of the day I don’t think it’s been anything special other than learning to listen, and understanding that I can’t fix people, but what I can do is offer to guide them to the help that they need. But I had to learn that, right?” MORE

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Addressing bullying and harassment in the workplace must be a business priority

January 30th, 2019 Respect in the Workplace, Sheldon Kennedy

SOURCE: NEWSWIRE

NEWS PROVIDED BY

KPMG LLP 

Jan 29, 2019, 11:19 ET


Sheldon Kennedy and panel of leading voices on workplace issues say today’s employees will no longer stand by and tolerate abuse

Organizations need to make workplace respect a priority or risk losing their people and damaging their reputations

TORONTOJan. 29, 2019 /CNW/ – Organizations that don’t seriously address bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) in their workplaces will struggle to attract and retain good employees and suffer from poor productivity, concluded a panel of leading voices on workplace issues speaking at the National Club in Toronto.

“Organizations need to tackle this uncomfortable topic, or risk falling behind,” says Sheldon Kennedy, abuse survivor and co-founder of the Respect Group. “They need to ask the tough questions to determine if this type of behaviour is happening in their organization. They need to be prepared for what they might find and be committed to taking action to address and end it.”

Kennedy joined a panel of leading voices at the National Club to talk about the cause, impact and solutions to workplace abuse and harassment. Joining him on the panel were Louise Bradley, President & CEO, Mental Health Commission of CanadaPamela Jeffery, President, The Pamela Jeffery Group and Soula Courlas, Partner, KPMG.

The panel noted that ignoring the issue not only affects employee retention but it hurts productivity and profitability. Experiencing BAHD in the workplace can trigger mental health problems and illnesses, which, according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, are the leading cause of short‐ and long‐term disability in Canada. The economic burden has been estimated at $51‐billion per year, almost $20‐billion of which comes from workplace losses.

While pointing out the risks of not addressing the issue, the panelists noted that many organizations are taking real action to address the issue. “This isn’t just about focusing on the bad individuals,” says Kennedy. “Ninety-eight per cent of individuals want to be good. So focus on them and give them the tools to be better.”

For those companies who don’t know where to start they agreed that the most important step was instituting a culture of respect and zero tolerance for toxic behaviour in their organizations – a tone that needs to come straight from the CEO or the top of the organization.

“This will require a willingness from leadership to face the hard truths about what is happening inside their walls,” says Courlas, who leads KPMG’s People and Change Advisory business. “Bullying can be subtle. Education is key to helping people recognize it. Leadership has a duty to proactively work towards eradicating this type of behaviour, which will inevitably help unlock the best of their people.”

The panel also focused on the impact of changing demographics in the workplace and the importance Millennials, who will soon comprise the largest age group in the workforce, place on culture and organizational values. “Millennials care deeply about an organization’s values, and want to work with organizations who mirror their own,” adds Courlas. “Employers will need to meet their Millennial employees’ expectations or risk losing this valuable source of talent and future leaders. Millennials have also grown up in the age of social media and have seen its impact related to cyber-bullying and online harassment. It is completely unacceptable online and therefore the same expectation needs to be upheld in the workforce.”

Kennedy adds that the Millennial generation doesn’t attach the same stigma to being a victim of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination as previous generations. “They are far less prone to staying quiet if they witness such behaviour. Systems need to be in place to support them in raising these types of instances and they need to see them being dealt with effectively. If not, they will leave and tell everyone why.”

About KPMG in Canada

KPMG LLP, an Audit, Tax and Advisory firm (kpmg.ca) is a limited liability partnership, established under the laws of Ontario, and the Canadian member firm of KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”). KPMG has over 7,000 professionals/employees in 38 locations across Canada serving private and public sector clients. KPMG is consistently recognized as an employer of choice and one of the best places to work in the country.

The independent member firms of the KPMG network are affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss entity. Each KPMG firm is a legally distinct and separate entity, and describes itself as such.

About Respect Group Inc.

Respect Group (respectgroupinc.com) was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Respect Group is made up of a team of over 30 talented individuals whose passion is to create a global culture of Respect. As Canada’s leading on-line provider of prevention education related to BAHD, Respect Group has certified over 1.2 Million Canadians involved in sport, schools and the workplace. Respect Group is a Certified B Corporation (bcorporation.net).

SOURCE KPMG LLP

For further information regarding this partnership and Respect in the Workplace: Danica Kelly, dkelly@respectgroupinc.com

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Breakfast Television: Sheldon Kennedy Discusses Respect Group KPMG Partnership

January 23rd, 2019 Respect in the Workplace

Our Co-Founder Sheldon Kennedy joined Breakfast Television this morning to talk about our partnership with KPMG and how organizations can build a safe and respectful environment for their employees. You can watch the full clip here:

 

kaillie humphries, cbc, harassment, athlete abuse, sport harassment, sport abuse

Canadian bobsled star Kaillie Humphries alleges harassment

January 22nd, 2019 General News

Source:  THE CANADIAN PRESS

Posted Jan 19, 2019 8:35 pm EST

Canadian Olympic athlete Kaillie Humphries poses for a photo at the Olympic Summit in Calgary, Alta., Saturday, June 3, 2017. Bobsleigh Canada Skeleton has confirmed that former Olympian Kaillie Humphries filed a harassment complaint with the organization. Humphries stepped away from competition in October before the World Cup season began. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Olympic bobsledder Kaillie Humphries says she has filed a harassment complaint with Canadian officials, and that her case is why she is not competing in World Cup races this season.

Humphries told CBC for a story published Saturday that she “can no longer be silenced because of other people’s actions,” though she stopped short of specifying what type of harassment she is alleging took place.

She is a three-time Olympic medallist and two-time Olympic champion. Humphries announced in October that she was not competing this season, though never detailed why until now.

“I found myself in a position where my workplace environment was impaired and I couldn’t compete,” Humphries told CBC.

Bobsleigh Canada spokesman Chris Dornan told The Associated Press that the federation “has been made aware” of Humphries’ allegations, and that triggers an probe by an independent investigator.

“We take any allegations of this nature very seriously,” Dornan said. “A safe training and competitive environment for everyone involved in our sport is Bobsleigh Canada Skeleton’s No. 1 priority. This is a highly confidential case. Out of respect to all parties involved, and the process, we will not be commenting further on this matter until the investigation is complete.”

Humphries has been one of the most dominant women in bobsledding, with four World Cup overall titles in the past six seasons. She was the Olympic gold medallist in 2010 and 2014, and took third at last year’s Pyeongchang Games.

“My entire career is at stake, who I am personally,” Humphries told CBC. “I’m risking everything to be in this position. It’s not something I take lightly. So yeah, for me personally there’s a lot at stake.”

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Sheldon Kennedy Youth Outdoor Classic

January 22nd, 2019 Sheldon Kennedy, Swift Current

For Immediate Release
January 21st, 2019

Sheldon Kennedy Youth Outdoor Classic
February 7th, 2019 

The City of Swift Current and Safe Places would like to invite our community to attend a special ceremony to mark the first game of the Scotiabank Sheldon Kennedy Youth Outdoor Classic as part of the 2019 Scotiabank Hockey Day in Canada events.

Sheldon Kennedy, CM AOE OM, along with Sportsnet and Ron MacLean, will be attending to drop the puck for the first game and to cheer on our participants.

The Scotiabank Sheldon Kennedy Youth Outdoor Classic will provide the opportunity to meet Sheldon, cheer on our teams, and be part of history as we are making some very special announcements.

There will be coffee, hot chocolate and treats for all to enjoy.

Due to the set-up of the Scotiabank Hockey Day in Canada activities there will be limited parking available close to the event. However, there will be parking attendants onsite to assist in getting everyone where they want to go.

We look forward to celebrating this tournament with you!

Date: Thursday February 7th, 2019
Time: 3:30pm
Location: Riverdene Outdoor Rink

-30-

For more information Please contact: 

Kelly Schafer
Safe Places Manager
City of Swift Current
306.750.7800
k.schafer@swiftcurrent.ca

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The Grand Joins The Movement With Respect Group Inc.

January 22nd, 2019 Respect in the Workplace

Jan 22, 2019, 08:00 ET

 

CALGARY – JANUARY 22, 2019/ – The Grand in Calgary Canada announced today that it will become the first arts organization in North America to become Respect Certified. The Grand has Joined the Movement with Respect Group, a forward-thinking organization founded by former NHLer turned victims’ rights crusader Sheldon Kennedy to deliver training to equip employees with the education and skills needed to prevent bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) in the workplace.

 

“Programs are one thing, making them a requirement for all members of the organization is about leadership and accountability,” said Sheldon Kennedy, Co-Founder of Respect Group. “Congratulations to the Grand for moving how we treat one another from the Policy category to the Priority category!”

“We at The GRAND are thrilled to be collaborating with Sheldon Kennedy and the Respect Group to help our theatre enhance its workplace culture, not only to eliminate unacceptable behaviours, but to create a positive and supportive environment that unlocks the diverse skills and ideas of our most valuable asset – our people.” – Tony McGrath, Chief Executive Officer, The Grand.

 

About The Grand

The Grand is situated on the land where the Bow River meets the Elbow River. The traditional Blackfoot name of this place is Mohkinstsis, which is also referred to as the City of Calgary. We honour and acknowledge Mohkinstsis and the traditional Treaty 7 territory and oral practices of the Blackfoot confederacy: Siksika, Kainai, Piikani as well as the Iyarhe Nakoda and Tsuut’ina nations who also call this place home.  We also acknowledge that this territory is home to the Métis Nation of Alberta, Region 3 within the historical Northwest Métis homeland.

The Grand is a not-for-profit organization (Charitable Registration: 134483981 RR0001). Since 2006, the theatre has been a centre for creation and presentation of contemporary performance from Calgary, Canada, and around the world. In 2019, we embark on a new chapter with a new vision for the future.

 

About Respect Group Inc.

Respect Group (respectgroupinc.com) was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Respect Group is made up of a team of over 30 talented individuals whose passion is to create a global culture of Respect. As Canada’s leading on-line provider of prevention education related to BAHD, Respect Group has certified over 1.2 Million Canadians involved in sport, schools and the workplace. Respect Group is a Certified B Corporation (bcorporation.net).

 

For further information: media@respectgroupinc.com

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Cyberbullying of Canada’s World Juniors brings to light ugly side of hockey culture

January 18th, 2019 General News

Source: City News 1130 BY MARCUS FITZGERALD AND HANA MAE NASSAR

Posted Jan 4, 2019 6:12 am PST

Last Updated Jan 4, 2019 at 12:41 pm PST

 

 

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – As some of Canada’s World Junior hockey players caught some harsh criticism on social media following a quarterfinal loss this week, it served as another look into the darker side of the culture of the sport.

It can start at an early age through a slightly different lens.

Matt Bell, 19, is a youth hockey official in Stratford, Ontario, and recently posted an open letter on Twitter.

He described getting some nasty verbal feedback from one parent in particular, and is trying to remind everyone that hostility in the face of something you don’t agree with isn’t the best way to go.

Sean Raphael, the referee-in-chief for the B.C. Amateur Hockey Association, says much has been done to take that kind of thing out of youth hockey.

However, he admits it still exists.

“There’s going to be some of that negative feedback, frustration,” Raphael tells NEWS 1130. “People maybe not understanding what the officials are doing when they’re right, or not understanding the human component to it — that they are going to mistakes and how to appropriately, maybe, address their frustration when they see somebody maybe make a mistake.”

While some of the verbal abuse on and off the ice can be extreme, Raphael says everyone needs to continue to work to phase that element out of the game.

“If we want to eliminate checking from behind or head injuries, and we implement rules to address them, overnight the philosophy doesn’t change, right? It takes time to condition it into what the new expectation is. And we maybe need a little bit more focus on what that expectation is of conduct.”

Work is ongoing to try and address the issue, he adds, however, Raphael says sometimes it’s still easy to forget where the line is.

“I think it’s just a matter of everybody in the culture understanding that everyone has a role to play in the game, and that everyone’s an individual person on the ice and that we shouldn’t really get too caught up on trivialities of the sport and that we’re all there for the same goal.”

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University of Michigan Fires Gymnastics Coach With Ties to Nassar Scandal

January 18th, 2019 General News

Source: The New York Times 

By Mihir Zaveri

 

The University of Michigan athletics department said Sunday that it would end its contract with a former U.S.A. Gymnastics executive connected to the Lawrence G. Nassar sexual abuse scandal, just days after the university hired her as a coaching consultant for its women’s gymnastics team.

The university’s decision to move on from the former executive, Rhonda Faehn, is the latest fallout from the scandal, in which Nassar, a former doctor for the United States women’s gymnastics team and Michigan State University, was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for sex crimes against female athletes.

Ms. Faehn, who was fired in May after serving as senior vice president of U.S.A. Gymnastics for three years, had not been charged with a crime in the scandal, the University of Michigan noted when it hired her. She voluntarily testified before Congress in June that she had passed reports about Nassar’s abuse to her boss, the federation’s president, and believed he had promptly acted on them.

But outcry built after she was hired on Thursday, with some university regents and members of the public demanding an end to the contract with Ms. Faehn, The Detroit News reported Sunday.

“I have come to the conclusion that it is not in the best interest of the University of Michigan and our athletic program to continue the consulting contract with Rhonda Faehn,” Athletic Director Warde Manuel said in a statement. “It was the wrong decision, and I apologize.”

The athletics department did not answer further questions about Ms. Faehn’s firing. Efforts to reach Ms. Faehn, who led the women’s gymnastics program at the University of Florida to three straight N.C.A.A. titles, were not successful.

Ms. Faehn was believed to be the first U.S.A. Gymnastics official who was told about Nassar’s abuse, The Indianapolis Star reported in May.

During her testimony before Congress, she described how she had told the former president of U.S.A. Gymnastics, Steve Penny, about a coach’s concerns about Nassar in July 2015. She said that she assumed Mr. Penny would quickly report the concerns to law enforcement, and that he had directed her not to discuss “the current issue” about a member of the medical staff with anyone.

In an announcement about her hiring, Mr. Manuel said that after the university’s “exhaustive due diligence,” it “felt comfortable that coach Faehn reported all information available to her regarding Larry Nassar and that she cooperated fully.”

 

“Neither an internal investigation by U.S.A. Gymnastics or a criminal investigation by the F.B.I. have assigned culpability or resulted in any charges against her,” Mr. Manuel said in the announcement.

It is not clear what exactly led to the university changing direction or when Ms. Faehn’s contract is set to end. As of Sunday night, the university’s website still listed her as an assistant coach.

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Hockey Night in Canada podcast: Women making strides in hockey

January 18th, 2019 Respect in Sport

Rob Pizzo talks to Hayley Wickenheiser about how far the women’s game has come

Source: CBC Sports · 

The Hockey Night In Canada podcast is a weekly CBC Sports production.

In each episode, host Rob Pizzo is joined by colourful characters within hockey to discuss great moments and great players and talk about today’s stars. The Hockey Night podcast brings you beyond the boxscore with insight you won’t find anywhere else.

In this week’s episode of the Hockey Night In Canada podcast, we are talking about women and the impact they have made in hockey.

Women’s hockey has come a long way in the last 30 years.

Women’s hockey really took off after making its Olympic debut in 1998. The thrilling gold-medal game, in which the Americans topped Canada, started one the greatest hockey rivalries of all time.

Since then, women have taken great strides and are now coaching, scouting, broadcasting and making hall of fame speeches.

But there is still room to grow — why doesn’t the NHL have female referees, head coaches or general managers?

Five-time Olympian and four-time gold medallist Hayley Wickenheiser joins Pizzo to discuss women’s growth in the hockey world. In her role as the assistant director of player development for the Toronto Maple Leafs, she has helped break down barriers and offers insight into what is still considered a male-dominated sport.

WATCH | Hayley Wickenheiser: Hockey is an “old boys’ club and a white male-dominated sport”

This week’s episode focuses on women in hockey — from the front office, to coaching, and also the broadcast booth. 0:59

Cheryl Pounder is a two-time gold medallist, who traded in her stick for a microphone to work as a hockey reporter at the Olympics in Pyeongchang. Pizzo talks to her about her transition into broadcasting.

Ice Level reporter Sophia Jurksztowicz has a conversation with one of the pioneers of women’s hockey —​ Manon Rhéaume. She was the first woman to play in any of the major North American pro sports leagues, suiting up in net for an exhibition game try out with the Tampa Bay Lightning in 1992.

Be sure to subscribe to the Hockey Night in Canada podcast to get a new episode each week. It’s available on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Tune In or wherever you get your podcasts.

Listen to previous Hockey Night podcasts

Episode 14:

With the NHL season reaching the halfway point, it’s time to take a look the highs and lows of the year so far. Stanley Cup champion Glenn Healy helps breakdown what has transpired so far this season.

Episode 13:

We take a look back at the best interviews of 2018, which includes Daniel Carcillo opening up about the hazing he experienced as a member of the Sarnia Sting.

Episode 12: 

Hockey books are the perfect gift for any rabid fan and Jay Baruchel, Ken Reid and James Duthie have a few suggestions that should cover anyone on your holiday lists.

Episode 11:  

The NHL recently confirmed that when the 2021-22 season begins, there will be 32 teams in the league. We take a closer look at Seattle’s expansion bid, the history of expansion, as well as the future of expansion.

Episode 10: 

The axe has fallen on four coaches and one general manager so far this season, but we sometimes forget that coaches are human and have families. Former NHL coach Barry Melrose breaks down what life is like for coaches after they’re fired.

Episode 9:

Hazing has been an accepted part of hockey for decades now. But recently some disturbing stories have come into the public eye. Stories that involved abuse, bullying, and some horrible behaviour … all disguised as “hazing.”

Episode 8: 

They’re a unique breed — the keepers of the crease are often known to be a little eccentric. Ilya Bryzgalov joins in to help explain what makes them so different from their teammates.

Episode 7:

Recent HHOF inductee Jayna Hefford joins Pizzo to break down the 2018 class, while selection committee member Brian Burke sheds some light on who the most important person in the game is — and it may not be who you think.

Episode 6:

Pizzo sits down with Hockey Night in Canada host Ron MacLean to talk about the top storylines one month into the season and MacLean also fuels the debate over who the best player in the game is right now.

Episode 5:

Hockey fans depend on certain trusted insiders to get their breaking news, but how exactly do they get these scoops? Turns out it’s harder work than some might expect.

Episode 4:

The fans love seeing the puck in the net…so what about the poor guys between the pipes? Are they getting pummelled for the sake of rule-tinkering?

Episode 3:

Could there be a more thankless gig? Perfection means being ignored. A single mistake and you are marked for years of noisy abuse. Don Koharski officiated over 1,700 regular season games. He and Pizzo discuss the infamous “donut incident”.

Episode 2:

Rivalries are the heart and soul of NHL excitement, but the days of brawling are mostly a thing of the past. Chris Nilan and Kris Draper talk about those old grudges, while some current players insist rivalries are as hot as ever.

Episode 1: 

At the beginning of every NHL season, hockey fans generally have more questions than answers when it comes to their favourite teams — and the start of the 2018-19 campaign was no different. Pizzo tackled five burning questions on the minds of the hockey faithful.

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