Our Mission

Empowering people to recognize and prevent bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) through interactive, online training courses.Harassment Prevention Training

Our Vision

Eliminate bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) by inspiring a global culture of respect.

Canadians Respect Certified

Respect Group is a Certified B Corporation. B Corps are companies that use business as a force for good, aspiring to solve social and environmental problems. Becoming a B Corp was important to us in order to share our business values with our clients and employees so that, together, we can all be proud.

All bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination online prevention training courses that are delivered and produced by Respect Group have been approved and certified by Respect Education, an educational offering of the Canadian Red Cross.

Respect Group is proud to give-back +10% of our annual revenue to not-for-profit organizations across Canada.

The Respect Platform Advantage

FAQ

Frequently asked questions about accessing our programs, how to log in, obtaining your certificate, or what to do in the event you witness bullying, abuse, harassment or discrimination.

Why Respect Matters

People want to be involved with organizations that demonstrate Respect. Often, Vision or Mission Statements include the word “Respect” however, few organizations have empowered and equipped ALL members of their team with the necessary tools and training to ensure a positive and psychologically safe environment.

Contact Us

Respect Group takes your privacy seriously. By submitting a request for information by email to a general or specific Respect Group email address, you are consenting to have a representative of Respect Group contact you by email.                   

About Us

Respect Group was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Respect Group is made up of a team of 30 talented individuals whose passion is to create a global culture of Respect.

We have enlisted pre-eminent experts to develop a best in class curriculum and e-learning platform. Expert content and a professional online training and certification model round out Respect Group’s fully outsourced risk management behaviour-change solutions for sport, schools and the workplace.

wayne-mcneil-1024x678

Wayne McNeil

Wayne McNeil was Trustee and Vice-Chairman of the Rocky View School Division, volunteer President of the Sheldon Kennedy Foundation, which raised over $1.2 Million during the 1998 Cross-Canada Skate to raise awareness for the prevention of child abuse, served as Chairman of the Alberta Gymnastics Federation for six years and is a Board Member of the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre.

These volunteer roles and his commitment to child advocacy lead Wayne to co-found Respect Group Inc.; Canada’s first, on-line, abuse, discrimination, bullying and harassment prevention training program for community/sport organizations, schools and corporations.

Wayne has a seasoned, professional background in Information Technology and Project Management that he developed through key global positions with Bell Canada, 3Com Corporation and Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC). This strong IT expertise enabled Wayne to create a solid team and technology approach for Respect Group. Wayne was instrumental in forging an exclusive partnership with the Canadian Red Cross to combine Canada’s best abuse, bullying and harassment prevention curriculum (Respect Education) with Respect Group ‘s world-class, on-line training technology.

In 2007, Wayne was awarded the Canadian Red Cross Caring Award for his leadership in the promotion of violence and abuse prevention education.

Wayne McNeil   

Co-founder

sheldon-kennedy-1024x681

Sheldon Kennedy

Sheldon Kennedy won a Memorial Cup, World Junior Gold Medal and skated for three teams in his eight-year NHL career. He is best known for his courageous decision to charge his Major Junior Hockey league coach with sexual assault for the abuse he suffered over a five-year period while a teenager under his care. Through this disclosure, and the important work that Sheldon continues to do, he has become an inspiration to millions of abuse survivors around the world.

Sheldon has been instrumental in bringing governments, public and private sector partners together to work collaboratively to influence policy change and improve the way child abuse is handled. He has influenced changes in Canadian law and has taken his message to the International Olympic Committee and the US Senate.

Sheldon is the Lead Director at the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre, the first-of-its-kind in Canada, offering full wrap-around services for victims of child abuse. He is also the Co-Founder of Respect Group, which provides empowering online abuse, bullying and harassment prevention education to sport organizations, schools and the workplace.

Sheldon’s awareness contributions are many:

  • He in-line skated across Canada in 1998 to highlight the issue of child abuse and donated 100% of the proceeds ($1.2M) towards abuse prevention programs. During this skate he was presented with the keys to the cities of Ottawa, Toronto and Winnipeg.
  • His life story was made into an award winning TV movie.
  • In 2006 he published “Why I Didn’t Say Anything”; a riveting account of the many psychological impacts of abuse.
  • He has shared his story through countless media appearances including Oprah, ABC’s Nightline, W-5, The Fifth Estate, and was named Canada’s newsmaker of the year in 1997.
  • In 2016, Swift Current the documentary featured Sheldon’s story, providing a startling and never before seen look at recovery from childhood sexual abuse trauma.

 

Sheldon has received several awards for his tireless work including:

  • Honorary Doctor of Laws, University of Regina, 2018
  • Hockey Canada Order of Merit, 2018
  • Honourary Bachelor of Business Administration, SAIT, 2016
  • Honourary Bachelor of Child Studies and Child and Youth Care, Mount Royal University, 2016
  • Member of The Order of Canada, 2015
  • Member of The Order of Manitoba, 2015
  • Alberta Order of Excellence 2016
  • Honourary Doctorate of Laws, University of Calgary, 2015
  • Lincoln Alexander Outstanding Leader Award, University of Guelph, 2015
  • The David Foster Foundation Humanitarian Award, 2014
  • Calgary Citizen of the Year 2013
  • Honourary Doctorate of Laws, University of the Fraser Valley, 2012
  • Scotiabank Humanitarian Award, 2012
  • Canadian Red Cross Caring Award, 2007

Sheldon Kennedy   

Co-Founder

What Our Clients Have To Say

University of Calgary is proud to be the first academic institution in Canada to launch the Respect in the Workplace Program.

We believe the benefits of a respectful workplace include improved team communication, enhanced organizational health, reduced absenteeism, and increased morale and productivity.

Respect in the Workplace is helping us build a stronger, more vibrant campus culture, where every member feels valued for their contributions

Dr. Elizabeth Cannon
President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Calgary

Obviously, super impressed with the program. Great to have it in such short bursts, and the app made it so convenient (I did most of it on my skytrain commute!).

The messages are varied and made to be relevant to the parents, somehow in a way that empowers them to take action. I never felt like I was being talked down to. Even having done many similar trainings, I learned new things, and felt more confident to take action.

It exceeded all my expectations, and quite honestly, it’s in my top online education programs of all time.

Kate Kloos
Manager, Coach Development, Viasport
The Respect in School program has had a lasting impression here at Moncton High School by empowering the bystander in the prevention of bullying, abuse and maltreatment.

The Respect in School program provides the user the skills to recognize, identify and report suspected abuse, bullying and maltreatment. Countless students reported and disclosed past abuse and bullying during the implementation of the program and most sought counselling for the first time.

The implementation of the Respect in School Program and sharing Sheldon Kennedy’s journey of hope and healing has been one of the most powerful things I have done in my sixteen-year teaching career.

Craig Eagles
Teacher, Moncton High School

Media

Sheldon Kennedy Hands Child Advocacy Centre Back To The Community

Sheldon Kennedy Hands Child Advocacy Centre Back To The Community

­

­

 

Respect Group is proud of the work Sheldon Kennedy has done for the community of Calgary and beyond. We fully support his decision to hand the Calgary Child Advocacy Centre back to the community.

 

Please read below for Sheldon’s statement.

________________________________________________________________

 

For Release December 11, 2018 at 12 PM MST

 

Sheldon Kennedy hands Child Advocacy Centre back to the Community

 

I write this with some sadness, a great sense of relief and, with no regrets. I have given it my all.

 

For the last 23 years I have made myself personally accessible and available to advocate and help those in need of telling their stories of abuse. I have spoken, one on one with thousands of victims, engaged in countless media interviews, keynote speeches, fundraisers, lobbied governments to change legislation and even in-line skated across Canada to raise awareness. It has been a daunting and all-consuming commitment.

 

From first introducing the idea of a Child Advocacy Centre to our Chief of Police in 2010, to opening the Calgary Child Advocacy Centre in 2012 and having it renamed the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre in 2013, I further stepped up that important work through my volunteer commitment to the SKCAC. I now understand that my name on the building really meant a personal responsibility for the day to day practice, the wellness of our front-line workers, the satisfaction of our donors and volunteers and the proper treatment of the victims we serve. This has been a very rewarding 8 years of my life and, at the same time, it has taken its toll.

 

For the past several months I have had ongoing and emotional conversations with my family and close friends. They have been a great support and, through this process, I have decided to remove my name from the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre.

 

I always preach to others that, first and foremost, they need to take care of their own mental health and find balance in their lives. I now need to take my own advice.

 

I need to refocus my efforts on my work at Respect Group, the company I co-founded, that educates those involved in sport, schools and the workplace on the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination. We have trained over 1.2 million Canadians thus far but there is much more to be done including our involvement in the International Safe Sport movement. And, most importantly, I want to give my full attention and love to my family.  My daughter Ryan, who is now in University, my partner Jen and our five month old son, Lochlin.  I want to be present and enjoy being the best dad and partner I can possibly be.

 

I want to acknowledge all of the front line workers that have or continue to work at the Calgary Child Advocacy Centre.  You are my heroes. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. And to each of the Agencies who took the risk of working together, you have demonstrated that integrated practice is possible and creates better outcomes for victims. You have also set the standard for your colleagues across the province working in the other regional Child Advocacy Centres.

 

I want to thank the media for your incredible support. You were always there to help tell my story and leverage the message to educate Canadians and offer solutions.  You have allowed us to change the conversation on these issues forever.

 

I want to thank every corporation, individual and event that gave so generously to the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre.  You have all made a significant difference with your kind gifts. I know you will continue to support the Calgary Child Advocacy Centre.

 

To those who have served on the Board, the SKCAC core staff and volunteers, thank you for your passion and dedication.

 

To Prime Minister Stephen Harper, The Honourable Rona Ambrose and The Honourable Peter MacKay: thank you for understanding the importance of Child Advocacy Centres, the impact of early childhood trauma and for your leadership in creating the Victims Bill of Rights. I am honoured to have been able to work with each of you. Thank you for helping us elevate the conversation to a level not previously seen.

 

To the thousands of victims we have served: be proud that you have found your voice, stay strong and make healing your focus. You continue to inspire me.

 

To those victims who still may not have come forward: you will always have a safe place to go and be heard at the Calgary Child Advocacy Centre.

 

Today, I am healthy and excited about my next chapter. I will continue the crusade, but with greater balance. I am also comforted to know that the Calgary Child Advocacy Centre and our community are ready to carry the torch. It has become clear that I will not be able to achieve the critical balance I need in my life without taking my name off the Centre. Furthermore, our community will never fully own the issues with my name still on it. The time has come and the future is bright.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Sheldon Kennedy, CM, AOE, OM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sheldon Kennedy will not be making any further comments.

For any inquiries please contact Sheldon.info@respectgroupinc.com

__________________________________________________________________________________

Respect Group was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Offering certification programs for Community/Sport Organizations (Respect in Sport), Schools and the Workplace, Respect Group has certified over 1,200,000 Canadians.

 

We welcome and encourage organizations to view our programs at: www.respectgroupinc.com

 

 

Former St. Michael’s students share stories of bullying dating back decades

Former St. Michael’s students share stories of bullying dating back decades

Dave Trafford had an incredible time at St. Michael’s College School four decades ago. He was the student body president, played on the hockey team, performed in musicals and ran its newspaper. He had a close group of friends who all had a great time.

Or so he thought.

Last week, as the all-boys private school in Toronto was rocked by allegations of assault and sexual assault by students, Trafford discovered that two of his best friends had struggled with bullying and felt unsafe at St. Michael’s.

“I did not see it then,” Trafford said. “It’s shocking, disappointing and heartbreaking.”

A criminal investigation triggered by a video that police sources say shows several members of a St. Michael’s sports team pinning down a student and sexually assaulting him with a broom handle has now expanded to include at least six incidents. Six students – aged 14 and 15 – are already facing sex assault-related charges and police have warned more charges could follow.

The school has admitted that it has failed in its responsibility to keep students safe, saying the recent incidents clearly indicate it has a problem.

“We need to do much better at our culture and our student’s ability to talk to us,” the school’s principal, Greg Reeves, said earlier this week after police announced the criminal charges against the six students.

The growing scandal has forced alumni to grapple with the past and a number of them are coming forward with their own experiences of bullying and harassment at the school that stretches back decades.

“There’s a real opportunity for the school to take a good look at itself and go deep and figure out how and why it happened and how they missed this,” Trafford said. “And to find out everything that has happened in the past.”

 

A number of former students who spoke with The Canadian Press said they’re eager to share their stories as part of an internal review promised by the school.

 

Nathan Goveas graduated from St. Michael’s in 2003.

“I was bullied the entire time I was there, right from day one,” said Goveas, who’s now a teacher.

He wasn’t involved in sports.

“I’m a skinny brown kid. People made fun of my appearance. It was mostly verbal bullying,” he said.

He never complained, but said his mother grew worried when she noticed he was feeling “down” in Grade 11. So she went to the administration.

“The principal dismissed it as boys will be boys,” Goveas said. The bullying continued.

Kyle Fraser said he left St. Michael’s in 2013 after Grade 10, unable to deal with the bullying.

“Leaving was the best decision of my life,” he said.

“I was bullied non stop, very relentless, not only by the students (but also) by the staff.”

He said he was picked on because he struggled with math and science and also because he wasn’t as good at hockey as some other students there.

“All that stuff affected me for a very long time,” he said. He became depressed and anxious.

“I was suicidal at one point. It got really bad.”

Fraser, who now studies at a university in Ohio, shared his story at an alumni meeting at the school on Tuesday night and received a lot of support afterward.

“It was very warming and put me in a peaceful state of mind,” he said. “There are a lot of good people there.”

Fraser and Goveas said there was a wide range of opinions at the meeting.

“I think some alumni aren’t willing to recognize the issues,” Goveas said.

Jean-Paul Bedard went public with his story last week in wake of the scandal. He lived through a violent, sexualized hazing incident at the school in the 1980s. He didn’t attend the alumni meeting, but has offered his services to the school as not only a survivor of sexual assault, but also as a trained trauma peer mentor. The school has yet to take up his offer.

“I’m skeptical of this review, but I will certainly be sharing my story,” he said. “Their attitude seems to be ‘we know how to fix this and don’t need outside help.“’

D’Arcy McKeown said he had a great time at St. Michael’s. Just a few months after graduating from the Roman Catholic school in 2005, he says he was sexually assaulted with a broom handle at McGill University as part of a hazing with the football team.

He left after just two weeks and returned to his alma mater, St. Michael’s, which he called a “safe space to recover.” He volunteered with the school’s football program for a time, before eventually resuming his studies at the University of Toronto.

McKeown applauded the school’s desire to take a victim-centric approach as it deals with both the current incidents and the historical “deep dive” into its culture.

“You need to get everything out there,” he said. “If others’ unfortunate experiences can help guide St. Mike’s in preventing these things going forward, it’s for the best, as painful as it may be for some to tell these stories.”

St. Michael’s alumni will be helping the school with mentorship and workshops in the coming days and weeks in an effort to help the current students.

Former law school dean sues Thunder Bay’s Lakehead University for ‘racial discrimination’

Former law school dean sues Thunder Bay’s Lakehead University for ‘racial discrimination’

Angelique EagleWoman left her position as Dean of Law in April 2018

The first Indigenous Dean of Law in Canada is suing Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ont., for “constructive dismissal and racial discrimination” after issues related to what she believes were caused by systemic discrimination and a toxic work environment.

Angelique EagleWoman served as the head of the University’s Bora Laskin Faculty of Law for two years starting in 2016 after the university announced its plans to focus on Indigenous law as part of its core mandate in 2013. EagleWoman announced her departure in April 2018.

“We are arguing that Lakehead University breached her employment contract and effectively constructively dismissed her by not treating her in a way that was consistent with her role and duties and responsibilities as the dean of law,” said Paul Champ, a lawyer with Champ & Associates — the Ottawa-based firm that’s representing EagleWoman.

“We argue that she was regularly treated in a way that no dean would ever be treated,” he continued. “She was denied the fair exercise of authority that a dean would [have].”

“Senior administrators intervened regularly in her efforts to run the law school and, in the context of employment law, that kind of demeaning treatment is incompatible with an ongoing employment relationship.”

Champ said they’re claiming discrimination based on gender and Indigenous ancestry.

According to a written release on Wednesday from her lawyers, EagleWoman, she said she believes that the university was quick to publicize her appointment with donors and the media but was “less active in actually supporting her in the position.”

“I moved my family to Thunder Bay and was looking forward to a long and productive career as dean and professor of law,” EagleWoman was quoted as saying in the release. “But I found the reality of Lakehead University did not match its many promises, to me or the local Indigenous communities,” adding that she was forced to “carry nearly a full teaching load while still fulfilling [her] duties as dean.”

She said she faced opposition and hostility from some within the university not long after she took on the role.

EagleWoman added that her abilities to lead the law school were continually undermined by the school’s senior administration as they regularly made decisions about the law school without consulting her.

EagleWoman is suing the university for a total of $2.67 million for loss of income from the remainder of her term as dean and compensation for losing a tenured position as a full professor in the Faculty of Law.

She is also claiming for damages under the Human Rights Code for discrimination as well as moral, aggravated and punitive damages.

The suit was filed in Ontario’s Superior Court of Justice in Ottawa; the statement of claim notes that, while Thunder Bay “would be the natural venue” for the lawsuit, EagleWoman’s lawyers are pushing for the case to be heard in the nation’s capital “given the close relationship and connections between the defendant and the judiciary in the northwest region.”

A university spokesperson confirmed that the school has received the statement of claim from EagleWoman’s lawyers but that Lakehead will not comment on any litigation or personnel matters.

None of the allegations in the statement of claim has been tested in court.

CONTACT US

I'd like to learn more:

Media Inquiries

Privacy Policy

Helpdesk Support

Respect Group offers fully bilingual Helpdesk Support 7 days a week from 6 AM to Midnight MST.On the login page of your Respect Group Program you will see Helpdesk Support in the lower left-hand corner. Click there to see brief troubleshooting steps or how to contact the Helpdesk.

Sexual harassment training, Workplace harassment training, Workplace misconduct training, Workplace incivility, Incivility in the Workplace, Workplace bullying, sensitivity training, discrimination staff training, inclusive workplace training, workplace diversity training, inclusive / diverse workplace, How to create a strong culture and environment of inclusiveness? How to address workplace discrimination, bullying & harassment, How to provide employees with skills and tools to minimize hostility in the workplace? How to create a positive workplace? How can I teach my employees to respect our code of conduct? How can I bring my employees to the same page regarding accurate? What can you do as a manager to avoid harassment or bullying? Bill 168 training Ontario, Bill 132 training Ontario

Copyright © Respect Group Inc. All rights reserved.

Respect Group offers 24/7 bilingual helpdesk support.

To Assist our Helpdesk, we request you access the URL of the program where you are experiencing difficulty.

When viewing the program URL, you will see a link for Helpdesk Support in the lower left-hand corner . Click on this link to see brief troubleshooting steps or contact the Helpdesk.